Wednesday, January 23, 2008

Ferrari Enzo

The Enzo Ferrari is sometimes referred to colloquially (some say incorrectly) as the Ferrari Enzo and Ferrari F60; this gives the false impression that it was named for Ferrari's 60th anniversary, which is 2007 rather than 2003 when the Enzo was launched (the official internal nomenclature is actually F131). The Ferrari Enzo Ferrari is commonly referred to as just the "Enzo" with no marque or other words attached.

The car is named after the company's founder, Enzo Ferrari, who died in 1988.

Celebrating its first World Championship of the new Millennium, in Formula One, Ferrari built the Enzo to celebrate this achievement and the company named the car after its Scuderia's founder, Enzo Ferrari.

The Enzo was initially announced at the 2002 Paris Motor Show with a limited production run of 349 units and priced at US$643,330. The company sent invitations to existing customers, specifically, those who had previously bought the Ferrari F40 and Ferrari F50. All 349 cars were sold in this way before production began. Later, after numerous requests, Ferrari decided to build 50 more Enzos, bringing the total to 399.

Ferrari built one more Enzo - the 400th car - and it was auctioned by Sotheby's Maranello Auction on June 28, 2005, to benefit survivors of the 2004 Tsunami for €950,000 (US$1,274,229), almost twice its list price. This sum was presented to Pope Benedict XVI, while former Ferrari Formula One driver Michael Schumacher gave the pope a steering wheel to commemorate the donation. This wheel included a plaque which read, "The Formula 1 World Champion's steering wheel to His Holiness Benedict XVI, Christianity's driver."

The Enzo Ferrari typically trades above $1,000,000 (£500,000) at auction.

Three prototype "mules" were built, M1, M2, and M3. Each was bodied to look like a 348, even though the mules were built in 2000. The third mule was offered for auction alongside the 400th Enzo in June, 2005, bringing €195,500 (US$236,300).

(source :

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